August 24, 2012

Cool garage!!

After a day of golf last week I drove by a new subdivision and this house caught my eye - it has a drive-thru garage with roll-up doors at either end, a lift and room to work and store stuff.


The large house caught my eye, then I saw the semi-transparent roll-up doors - of which the open side showed though to the other end where there was another roll-up door. I took a peak inside and called out but no-one answered, so I knocked on the front door and asked the very lovely wife if I could take a peek. She told me it was her husbands baby (of course) and he was a farmer and broker - sounds like a good gig!


Above is from the inside looking out, under the lift.


Nice storage - all in workshop red.



 Below - just some of the toys that were at the ready. 
There was also a tricked out ATV on the lift and more bikes in another area.



Thanks to the lovely Mrs and her cool husband in Warman, SK!



Don't forget to check out the website at www.E-tekRestorations.com !  
My son Colton and I decided to try our hand at a few "How - to" videos. This is his first attempt at making videos:

E-tek Restoration: 67 Cougar Metal Work 1

E-tek Restorations: 67 Cougar Metalwork 2

E-tek Restorations: 67 Cougar Metalwork 3

Tell us what you think!



 Don't forget to check out the website at www.E-tekRestorations.com !

August 19, 2012

IMG-20120730-00073.jpg



 I've found over time that the topic of welding wires can get confusing, but like many things, trial and error - and advice from others - is often the way to success. MIG wire can be purchased from cheapo-tool outlets like PrincessAuto and Harbour Freight, industrial application places like Acklands, as well as welding-sepcific stores like Cannox. After years of buying various wires, I've settled on ESAB or Lincoln brands, which are made by welding-specific companies and not sold in the cheapo tool outlets. Although all the part and classification numbers may be the same, the higher-end wires seem to flow better, require less Amperage to burn and thus don't burn through as easily and weld better over small metal imperfections like rust and paint. They generally come in 5 and 12 lb spools, so give them a try if you haven't.

Welding up the final piece of the Cougar puzzle!

 

This section of the Cougar was hit hard and repaired poorly - so it fell to me to cut away the worst of it and then make it whole again. After about 20 hours of fabricating and welding, the piece fit well and matched up to the quarter extension that bolts to it:




 Don't forget to check out the website at www.E-tekRestorations.com !  
 I've found over time that the topic of welding wires can get confusing, but like many things, trial and error - and advice from others - is often the way to success. MIG wire can be purchased from cheapo-tool outlets like PrincessAuto and Harbour Freight, industrial application places like Acklands, as well as welding-sepcific stores like Cannox. After years of buying various wires, I've settled on ESAB or Lincoln brands, which are made by welding-specific companies and not sold in the cheapo tool outlets. Although all the part and classification numbers may be the same, the higher-end wires seem to flow better, require less Amperage to burn and thus don't burn through as easily and weld better over small metal imperfections like rust and paint. They generally come in 5 and 12 lb spools, so give them a try if you haven't.

Welding up the final piece of the Cougar puzzle!

 

This section of the Cougar was hit hard and repaired poorly - so it fell to me to cut away the worst of it and then make it whole again. After about 20 hours of fabricating and welding, the piece fit well and matched up to the quarter extension that bolts to it:




 Don't forget to check out the website at www.E-tekRestorations.com !